Arts And Crafts For Kids: Making A Paper Model Army Tank

Making paper models is a fun activity for children and adults. Find out how to make your own Army tank by reading and following the instructions in this article, which includes a list of necessary supplies.

Hobbyists, and even talented kids, have been creating models of airplanes and other flying machines by using paper for many years. It's not a flier, but a tank is still part of the military Army family.

To make your own paper model of an Army tank, you'll need to first purchase some card stock. This is generally a thick, white paper that, as its name implies, is used for making greeting cards. You can use copier paper for this project, but card stock is easier to use because it holds its shape better once it is folded.

The next step is to start the actual assembly of the tank. The easiest way to do this is to find a few pictures of a tank in a magazine or from another source. The best pictures will be shots from all sides, including the top, so you can get a complete view of it. Cut each picture out carefully. Then, glue each picture onto a sheet of card stock by using good - quality white glue. Allow the glue to dry thoroughly, then cut each picture out again. The final step is to assemble the pictures together and either transparent tape or white glue to securely hold them together.

There is another way to assemble a paper model tank, but it's a bit more complicated. The first step is to use a piece of card stock and a drawing pencil. Start with the top of the tank, which is known as the "turret". There is also a large gun barrel sticking out of the turret, and we'll build that next. Draw out an approximately four-inch rectangular shape on the card stock. Now, add another larger rectangular about an inch out from the original shape. Use a pair of scissors to cut the larger rectangle out. Then, cut the outer edge every inch or so they make tabs. Fold the tabs down, then set this piece aside. We'll refer to this piece as being "A".

The next step is to cut a strip of card stock- we'll refer to this as part "B"- about an inch wide, and long enough so that it can fit around the top of the "A" piece. Wrap it around "A" and secure it with tape or white glue. (Some of the tab area should be hanging out.) If you use glue, you might need to add a paper clip temporarily until it dries.

Now you'll need to use a hole punch to make a hole in the "B" part along one of the short ends. Cut a piece of card stock about three inches long and a half inch wide. You'll turn this into a gun barrel (part "C") by rolling the paper width-wise until it curves. Then, seal the sides together, secure them, and stick the barrel into the turret, part "A".



You'll need to make the body of the paper Army tank now for the turret to fit into. To do this, you'll need to use a pair of scissors to cut another rectangular piece that is a couple inches bigger than the turret is. Then, cut a strip of card stock that is about two inches wide and long enough to wrap around the rectangle.

These paper parts will be referred to as parts "D" and "E" respectively.

The next step is to cut the middle out of the top of the body of the tank. You'll need enough space to the turret will fit on top, and the tabs will bend over to attach it. Then, attach the turret, fold the tabs down, and secure it with white glue or tape.

The next pieces you'll make are parts "F", and "G", which are the rollers and the tracks. If you're not sure what these look like on a real tank, you should refer to a picture. A tank has four to six rollers that are covered with a track. Take a piece of card stock and use a pencil to draw two tracks (side view) and then draw in the rollers. At each end of the tracks, draw out a small rectangle tabs a couple inches long, and about an inch wide. Then, cut these pieces out; bend the tabs, and glue or tape a track to each side of the tank. Overlap the tabs and secure them together too.

Finally, paint or otherwise detail your paper model Army tank as you wish. You can detail the tracks, rollers, et cetera with a black magic marker to make them stand out.

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