How Do I Baby Proof A Child's Room?

How do I baby proof a child's room? Tips for child proofing a child's room. Mark Altman, founder and owner of The Childproofer, is an expert in child proofing, and suggests that the issues in a nursery are...

Mark Altman, founder and owner of The Childproofer, is an expert in child proofing, and suggests that the issues in a nursery are not unlike those elsewhere in the home.


"Look at the issues that are all consistent throughout the home such as outlets and furniture that can fall on the child." Altman says his son used to pull out his dresser drawers and use them to climb the dresser. That would make the dresser fall forward, so to properly child proof they had to secure the heavy furniture to the wall.




Another concern would be windows in a child's room. Says Altman, "We address windows so they can't open. We look at the quality of the glass to see if it's plate glass, double-paned or tempered glass." Children should not be able to fit through the window or raise or lower it by him or herself. Screens should not be used where a child could push and fall through them. Like in other rooms, care should be taken to make certain cords from blinds and drapes are out of reach and don't contain a loop that could strangle a child.

Crib safety is an important concern. Guidelines for what makes for an unsafe crib can be found at the Consumer Product Safety Commission website at www.cpsc.gov . Crib placement is also crucial for child proofing. Never place the crib in front of a window, next to furniture that the child can climb out onto, or near cords or outlets.

Bedding is another safety concern when child proofing a baby's room. Only use sheets that fit properly. Loose sheets can become twisted around a child and have been implicated in a number of child deaths. Also, once a child can pull him or herself to stand, remove all bumper guards or anything that the child can stack and stand upon. Children might use them and climb out or worse yet, fall out of the crib.

Stay abreast of what the current medical advice is concerning children's bedding especially in regards to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Fluffy soft blankets and bedding can prove hazards to children, and be careful about the toys you allow in the crib, as well.

Of course, all parents should have a smoke alarm in their child's nursery. It's relatively inexpensive yet a lifesaver.

Other concerns for a child's room include toys. If your baby shares a room with an older child, you must make sure that any toys that pose choking hazards are kept safely out of reach. To be certain you don't have any toys that pose a danger to children, or have been recalled, refer to the CPSC website listed above. Keep toys for older children separate and put out of baby's reach.

Also if you have a toddler with an infant, make certain the toddler cannot reach the infant in the crib, or pull down the sides of the crib. Baby monitors are also a helpful way to keep on top of safety in the nursery or child's room.

For all furniture and children's toys and products information, Altman highly recommends the CPSC website. "They have wonderful information for new parents on safe nurseries and safe toys."

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