What Is A Baker's Cyst?

What is a Baker's cyst? A Baker's cyst is a cyst which occurs behind the knee. A cyst is defined as a closed pocket or pouch of tissue, which is filled with fluid, air, pus, or other material.

Have you ever heard of a Baker's cyst? What is a Baker's cyst? From the name, you would probably assume it had something to do with a baker, perhaps a cyst on the hand due to the baker's great use of his hands, perhaps an old wive's tale suggesting the baker, who stands all day, thus contributing to problems with the knees. Well, this is not true. Despite the name, a Baker's cyst actually has nothing whatsoever to do with a baker.

A Baker's cyst is a cyst which occurs behind the knee. A cyst is defined as a closed pocket or pouch of tissue, which is filled with fluid, air, pus, or other material. A cyst, in itself, may be found practically anywhere on the body. A cyst is also generally not painful, although if it becomes large enough, a cyst can interfere with the activities of daily living, thus, may then pose a problem and need to be removed. Also, if a cyst becomes too large, it can press or compress nerves and such, indirectly causing or contributing to pain, or dysfunction of the affected body part.

A Baker's cyst is an accumulation of joint fluid that builds up behind the knee. Usually only one knee is affected. The symptoms of a Baker's cyst include:



- usually painless, the pain you may experience is usually coming from the source of the problem, not directly from the cyst itself

-swelling, nodule, fluid filled lump, behind the knee

-stiffness of the knee

Your doctor, the orthopedic surgeon, who is the bone doctor (and also the knee doctor), can diagnose the problem. A Baker's cyst is usually the symptoms of an underlying problem in the knee. Diagnostic tests can be done to determine if this is a Baker's cyst and also, what other problems are going on inside the knee.

If you are a physical, athletic and active person, the likelyhood of developing a Baker's cyst is greater. The doctor must find and treat the cause of what is making the extra fluid develop in the joint that is filling up the cyst. However, the cause of a Baker's cyst is not known. It is not hereditary. Most people who develop them, however do stand and/or use their legs alot, and are very active.

There is not much in the way of treatment of a Baker's cyst unless it is uncomfortable. Aspirin may be taken to relieve symptoms of swelling, stiffness and pain. The accumulation of fluid may be drained by a doctor if it is a problem. Often Baker's cysts subside and reoccur.

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