Do Cabin Options Exist To Keep Parents And Children Together In A Family?

Do cabin options exist to keep parents and children together in a family? Parents who choose to take their children on a cruise as part of their family vacation are often worried about their ability to stay together on a ship, but usually there is no need to be concerned.

Family cruising can be an extremely fun and rewarding experience for the entire family, according to Emily Motycka, a travel agent for AAA Travel in Omaha who specializes in helping families choose the perfect cruise experience. Parents who choose to take their children on a cruise as part of their family vacation are often worried about their ability to stay together on a ship, but usually there is no need to be concerned, said Ms. Motycka.


"On most cruise lines you can fit a family of 4 in any of the inside, ocean view, or balcony cabins," according to Ms. Motycka. "It will be tight quarters, but you can all fit." Depending on the cruise line and cabin category chosen, the kids could find themselves sleeping in bunk beds that fold up into the walls or ceiling, while the parents share a double bed. "As an extra bonus," added Ms. Motycka, "many kids find the fold-away beds to be quite fun and different - and sometimes this is an extra incentive to go to bed!"




If you have a family of five or greater, there are several options for you, as well, said Ms. Motycka. "If you have a larger family - or even if you would just like to spread out a bit more - cruise lines do have suites available, as well." Depending on the cruise line, a suite will give travelers two bedrooms (usually one bedroom with a queen-sized bed and one bedroom with twin-size beds and pull-down beds), a truly separate sitting area, a balcony, walk-in closets, and sometimes even more than one bathroom. These suites can usually sleep up to seven or eight people - some of them in the same pull-down or pull-out beds of the smaller cabins, some in regular beds, and sometimes even some in pull-out beds in the sitting area. (Deluxe suites also sometimes feature a separate private dining area, concierge service, whirlpool tubs, and other amenities unavailable to those traveling in smaller cabin sizes.)

A suite is "quite a bit more expensive" than a regular stateroom, said Ms. Motycka, "but they are available" and are sometimes a good option for larger families - especially those who want a touch of luxury on their trip.

However, according to Ms. Motycka, many travelers who have larger families - or those who just want to spread out or be able to have some private time - find that it's "more economical to get two cabins in a lower price range" rather than one large suite. This is especially true if your family will not take full advantage of - or can simply do without - the luxury amenities that usually accompany traveling in a suite.

If you think that booking two cabins in a lower price range might be the best option for your family, ask for cabins that adjoin. Most cruise lines offer at least a few adjoining cabins, which work just like the adjoining rooms in hotels. This is obviously the best option for families wishing to book two separate cabins. Some cruise lines currently offer a discount to families who are booking a second cabin for their teenage children, so be sure to ask your travel agent or booking agent if this type of discount is available to you.

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