Can The Right To Carry Extra Baggage Be Purchased When Buying A Ticket?

Can the right to carry extra baggage be purchased when buying a ticket? Technically, your plane ticket is simply a contract to get you safely from point A to point B. You cannot prepay excess baggage charges or include them in the price of your plane ticket.

Technically, your plane ticket is simply a contract to get you safely from point A to point B. You cannot prepay excess baggage charges or include them in the price of your plane ticket. You are allowed to take extra or excess baggage although you will have to pay for that privilege and the charges vary. The airline you are flying, as well as your destination, time of year and even the type of plane you are on can all make a difference to your free allowance and excess bag allowance.


Generally you are allowed two pieces of checked baggage as your free allowance (See question 1) If you take extra pieces or you have baggage that is overweight or oversize, you will pay excess charges. And if you take an extra piece of luggage that is also overweight, you will be charged twice! It may cost less to simply have an overweight piece rather than an extra piece. A typical excess baggage fee might be $100 (one way) for an extra bag, or a bag that is too heavy or too big. Excess charges may be greater if you are traveling overseas. Check with your airline representative or travel agency.




Some airlines also have baggage embargoes, usually to popular destinations such as the Caribbean or Florida, and usually at certain peak travel times. During the embargo period, the airlines anticipate these flights will be completely full and strictly limit the amount of baggage meaning no overweight or excess. A typical embargo period might be around Christmas and spring break.

Your airline may also impose a box embargo which is just what it sounds - no boxes are allowed as checked baggage although you can still generally take extra suitcases. Car seats for a baby and child strollers are generally exempt from embargoes, by the way.

Some sporting goods are free when checked instead of one of your bags and some sporting goods are always assessed a charge. There are also size and weight limitations for sporting goods, for example golf bags and ski bags.

If you are traveling with excess baggage, be sure to arrive at the airport a little earlier than usual and be prepared to pay any excess charges at that time. If your bag is only slightly overweight, the airline may not collect the charge - but be prepared. Some people when faced with excess baggage charges have been known to rush into the nearest airport store and buy a cheap suitcase - almost certainly a less expensive option than paying the excess.

Check with your airline the rules concerning excess baggage if you are traveling on a smaller plane or a commuter plane. You are still generally allowed your two checked pieces, but there may be more restrictions on taking extra pieces due to the small size of the plane.

And if you are connecting between different airlines, they may have different rules concerning excess baggage - usually, the most restrictive applies. You also may have to pay any excess charges twice if you have to claim and recheck your bags.

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