What Is The Cost Of Running A Geothermal Home?

What is the cost of running a geothermal home? To put geothermal in your home you can again think of the three parts. There's just the heat pump appliance itself which does the heating, cooling. Then there is the buried loop pipe or the well that goes underground. Then the third part is how you dist.

To put geothermal in your home, you can again refer to the three parts.
There's the heat pump appliance itself, which does the heating and cooling. Then there is the buried loop pipe or the well that goes underground. Then the third part is how you distribute the heat in your home; either you have duct work or you have radiant flooring. So, roughly speaking, each one of those three components can cost anywhere from $1,000 per ton up to $1,500 per ton of capacity. So, you can pay anywhere from $3,000 at the very low end per ton, up to about $5,000 per ton at the upper level. A typical home might have about 3 tons to 5 tons of heat pump required, based on a 2000 square foot floor space. You require 3 or 5 tons of heating and cooling, multiply that by $3,000 or $5,000 a ton, and you are looking at $10,000 up to about $25,000 for a typical home, depending on what the heating and cooling demands are.



That is where the payback period comes in, because that initial extra investment does cost a lot more than a conventional heating and cooling system. The payback period on your energy savings is generally saved in 5-10 years. Some people are fortunate to be in a state that has a number of energy incentives if you put in a more efficient system in your home, and then other places can qualify for energy mortgage. So you can, if you are building new construction, roll all that cost into a low interest mortgage if it is an energy savings measure. So, you can actually be paying about what you might pay for heating and cooling. You are breaking even at first and you never really have to pay off the system over the life of your home.


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