How Is The Food In Cologne, Germany?

How is the food in Cologne, Germany? Within six months I had gained 12 pounds. But I did a couple of things wrong. There is nothing simple about their food, everything they serve has a sauce or gravy, which...

There is nothing simple about their food, everything they serve has a sauce or gravy, which attributes to the heavy nature of the people who live there. Within six months I had gained 12 pounds. But I did a couple of things wrong. Number one, it took awhile before I learned enough of the language to understand that their big meal was at noon, not at night. Where we worked they had a cafeteria and served us very well for lunch. Then I was going home and cooking a typical American dinner. In Germany, they have their sandwiches at night, which is actually a much healthier way to eat since they have all day to burn off the calories. The Germans also walk everywhere. When you notice the heavy legs of the older generation German women, those are muscles because they walk so much on the hilly terrain.


Shopping for groceries is also different. They didn't have large refrigerators, most people had little apartment-sized refrigerators. They would go to the market on the way home from work - pop into the meat market and buy enough meat for dinner. They didn't plan ahead like we might and stock up.




They like bread and deep fry it, which was my other downfall. I loved the bread, especially brochine, which are hard crusted rolls. Inside it's the most delicate, moist, wonderful bread you can imagine, but very fattening.

They have meat regulations basically the same as we do in America. But when we first arrived, one of the biggest challenges was eating raw meat, raw pork. They serve sandwiches with raw, slimy pork. It was a delicacy.

A typical breakfast would be a three minute egg, bread, cold meat, and cheese on a plate or very thinly sliced meat like shaved, dried beef with gravy over toast. They had wonderful breakfast meat but it's hard to say exactly what it is because we don't eat that way. Most of the time their breakfast meats were pork or ham, very thinly sliced, and cheese. They might even take the meat and the cheese and make a little sandwich out of it. They are big on open faced sandwiches.

They also don't use spoons and they hold the fork in the left hand and the knife in the right hand. When I came home, for years I would still push my food on to my fork with my knife.

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