General Thomas Hooker

Thomas Hooker was the first minister of Cambridge, Massachusetts and one of the pioneer settlers in Conneticut. Edit Article First timers: For information on how to write the title, keywords and synopsis, click here. Be clear, not creative. Proposal: Thomas Hooker Proposal Description: Thomas Hooker was the first minister of Cambridge, Massachusetts and one of the pioneer settlers in Conneticut.

The true heroes of America are those who from time to time have left the comforts of civilized life and planted the seeds of new states deep in

the wilderness. Among the remarkable men of that description was the Reverend Thomas Hooker, the first minister of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and one of the pioneer settlers in Connecticut.

Thomas Hooker was born in Leicestershire, England in 1586 and was educated in Emanuel College, Cambridge. He began his labors as a Christian minister at about the time of the death of James the First, when Archbishop Laud began to harass the non-conformists. In 1630, Rev. Hooker was silenced, because of his non-conformity to the Established Church in

England and he founded a grammar school at Chelmsford. His influence was great; and falling under the ban of Laud, he was obliged to flee to Holland where he became an assistant minister to Dr. Ames, both at Delft and Rotterdam. He came to America with the Reverend Mr. Cotton in 1633 and was made pastor of the church at Cambridge in the Autumn of that year.

In 1636, Rev. Hooker, with other ministers, their families, and their congregations, about one hundred in all, left the vicinity of Boston for

the Connecticut valley, where the English had already planted settlements. It was a toilsome journey through the swamps and forests. They took quite a number of cows with them. These browsed upon the shrubs and grazed in swamp borders, and their milk gave nourishment for the



travelers. The journey was made in the pleasant month of June and on the fourth of July they reached the flowery banks of Connecticut and

received the hearty greetings of welcome of the little band of settlers who were seated on the site of the present city of Hartford. There in at the little meeting-house already built, Rev. Hooker preached when the Sabbath came, and administered the sacrament of the Lord's Supper

to everyone in the congregation. A greater portion of Rev. Hooker's followers settled at Hartford while some chose Wethersfield for a residence; and others, from Roxbury, went up the river twenty miles, and founded Springfield.

Mr. Hooker was one of the most powerful preachers of his time and wrote much and well on religious subjects. While preaching in the great church in Leicester, before he left England, one of the magistrates of the town sent a fiddler to the church-yard to disturb the worship service going on there. Rev. Hooker's powerful voice not only drowned the music, but it attracted the fiddler to the church door. He listened to the great truths that Hooker preached and became converted.

The Rev. Thomas Hooker was a man of great benevolence, and in every sphere of life he was eminently useful. He was not only the founder of the state of Connecticut, but he was one of New England's greatest men of God. He died at Hartford, Connecticut of an epidemic fever on

July 7, 1647 at the age of sixty-one years.

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