Getting A Job In The Catering Business

Getting a catering job: Londons' catering business community is easy, follow these guidelines for success and good money for the busy periods.

London is one of the premier places in the world for outdoor catering. The demand for corporate parties, private functions and other social events is huge. The style and output of these companies vary greatly, as do the pay scales and working conditions. I have personally worked for several different companies during my time as a student, and as such, my advice should be useful for anyone looking to work during the busy periods.

In England, the busy periods usually comprise the months of June, July, and December. There are jobs available the rest of the year, but these are often few and far between.

When looking into different companies for employment, there are several things that you should find out about each one before making any commitments.



1. Do they have a web-site? If they do then you should endeavour to visit it. Looking at the pages of their site should give an indication as to its quality. On the site, make sure that they have a selection of quality venues (places such as the Banqueting House in Whitehall, Vinopolis in London Bridge and The National Gallery), this is a sure fire way to see if they are a respectable company. The lesser regarded companies will not maintain contracts with established venues. Also, the web site itself should look good, this may seem superficial but appearances are everything in catering.

2. If you get the chance to see the warehouse from where the equipment is stored and the food is produced, it is important that you notice how tidy and well-ordered it is. If the warehouse is large and well presented, it is probable that it is a good company. They obviously have enough money to employ a good number of staff to keep running smoothly, which should mean that they don't treat you like slaves.

3. Try to find out how many company vans they have. The more they have would indicate that they are more successful, but also indicates how stingy they are. If the company is large and only has a small number of vans, then they must cut corners, including your pay and working conditions.

4. Find out how often casual staff are paid. The better companies will pay every week. Some of the worse companies will make you wait for up to six weeks before paying, which is unacceptable if you are in casual employment.

5. The location is another factor. If the company is based a long way from the centre of town, it is because they don't have a lot of money. Companies that are based closer to the centre are there because they can afford to be.

Following these guidelines should result in a prosperous and enjoyable time at work. Some of the advice may seem petty, but it could make the difference between getting a bad job and getting a good one.

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