Julius Caesar By Shakespeare: Words And Actions

While individuals and actions are important in every play, in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar the relationship of words and actions play a povital role in the development of the characters and the plot of the play.

In Julius Caesar, the relationship of words and actions play a pivotal role in the development of the characters and the plot of the play. First, the words and actions of Brutus allow him to convince himself that killing Caesar will be the best thing for the people of Rome. Second, the words and actions in both speeches after Caesar's death drum up different emotions and show the development of the characters in the play. Third, the words and actions taken after the death of Brutus convey messages about Roman society and culture.

During the first two acts of the play, Brutus is struggling in his own mind to decide if Caesar is, in actuality, doing harm to society, or if he is doing a good job and trying to help all of the Roman people. He struggles to decide what is the right thing to do. During his discussions with Cassius, he tries to justify the killing by saying things such as, "we will carve him up a dish for the gods and not as scraps for the dogs." In addition, Cassius attempts to justify the killing by showing and persuading, in words, why Caesar is on the same level as they are and why they need to stop him because he is trying to become a God. This is best shown in the example of when Caesar jumped into the Tiber for a swim, but then he had to be saved because he couldn't swim to the other side. By lowering Caesar to Brutus's level, he can then proceed to justify the killing.

Next, words and actions play a pivotal role in the speeches of both Brutus and Antony after the death of Caesar. First, the speech of Brutus revealed much about how Brutus attempted to appeal to the people and to persuade them that what he had done was the right thing. By saying that he was afraid of Caesar, he attempted to show to the people that he was trying to better society as a whole. Likewise, Antony also attempted to appeal to the people with his words and actions. First, by saying over and over that "Brutus is an honorable man" after showing that his actions clearly weren't honorable he showed that Brutus cared more about himself than the good of all of Rome.



This allows Antony to show the crowd that not only is Brutus dishonorable, but that he also sees things the same way that most of the people do. This gives him an advantage over Brutus and, in the end, he persuaded the people to agree with his cause.

In the end, the words and actions of the conspirators, avengers, Brutus and Antony advance the plot and importance of the play. The words and actions spoken and taken by the characters in this play allow for a development of Shakespeare's ideas of what is right, what is wrong and how we come to this conclusion.

© High Speed Ventures 2011