How To Plant A Topiary For Under $10.00

learn how to plant this topiary for under $10.00 and it grows to approximately to 4 feet tall.

If you are after that English country garden look, a topiary could be the simplest way to achieve this. Looks grande outside your front doorway, or sumptuous in the middle of your garden. You can put this topiary together for under $10.00 and it grows to approximately to 4 feet tall.

In fact having several and in a precise pattern as in groupings of two can give your garden a more sophisticated English garden look. So whether you want casual country or formal country, the topiary is a wonderful way to add a new dimension to your garden.Looks grand outside your front doorway, or sumptuous in the middle of your garden.

You can put this topiary together for under $10.00 and it grows to approximatelly to 4 feet tall. In fact having several and in a percise pattern as in groupings of two can give your garden a more sophisticated English garden look. So whether you want casual country or formal country, the topiary is a wonderful way to add a new dimension to your garden.

Planting your topiary is like any other container gardening you would do, except for a few additional steps. First of all it's the particular plants that you choose that give the topiary that English Cottage look. Pink flowers from the ivy geraniums look beautiful against the dark green foliage of the English Ivy.

To get the look start with a large planting container of your choice. The look of the container is important as the topiary carries the plants up along the wire frame, so the pot will show. To keep your topiary under $10.00 use a standard plastic container that has the look of terra cotta. You may add any embellishments you want to the container, in sponge painting, or adding moss on the outside of it. The container should be at least 24" in diameter to allow for growth to reach a minimum of 4 ft.

The next step is to make a simple tripod frame for the plants to cling to and you can train and manipulate to fill in the gaps when needed. I use a simple triangular tomato wire frame. The cost of the frame is negligible, usually under $1.00.



If you have compost that is aged and useable for container plantings use that as it's a good source of nutrients. Otherwise purchase regular potting soil. This will be your greatest expense for the topiary if purchased.

Wire the frame upside down to the top rim of your container. You may have to drill a few holes into the container rim to accomodate the frame. It's important to make it as stable and firm as you can it to accommodate the growth of the plants as you will be pushing and weaving in the tendrils and offshoots as they grow.

You can layer the bottom of the container with your choice for drainage, such as pebble, or large bark dust clumps, broken clay pottery, or styrofoam peanuts. A simple 1" layer is enough of any of those choices.

Fill your container with the potting soil, and I like to moisten it at this time, as it gives it a bit of weight and makes it easier to add your plantings. Especially if you are taking cuttings from your own garden.

The choice of plants for your topiary is important if you want a cottage feel. You can't beat the look of tiny tendrils of dark green ivy, mixed with the succulent leaves and delicate pink blooms of ivy geraniums. I simply transplant mine from the different areas I have them in my garden straight into the topiary container. If you purchase the plants, buy healthy and robust ones, and try and get as large of ones as you can. It will help to establish the look of your topiary and give you something to work with in the beginning.

Simply place the ivy and ivy geraniums into the soil mixture, adding one or two in the very middle. Wind what you can around the wire frame. The English Ivy is very easy to work with. The Ivy Geraniums will be less inclined to wind around the frame. I don't force it, and let it take on it's own look with a more casual growth. Usually this produces the casual English cottage look and gives the topiary a sumptuous look that spills over the sides of the container with pink blossoms.

The only up-keep to your topiary is regular watering, especially if kept outdoors, adding a liquid plant feed twice a year. I pinch off any dead blooms and leaves. As the plants grow, wrap the new shoots to fill in the wire frame. I let a few hang down in curly-ques along the planter.

Setting the container on top of something as a cut off trunk from a tree or another stand of your choice give the topiary even more stature and will look stately, all for under $10.00.

Don't stop with just one topiary. As the cost is minimal you can have several and if set out in twos gives entrances or patios that more formal look.

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