Project Manager Interview Questions

You are interviewing for a Project Manager position: what types of questions you may be asked and how to adequately prepare.

Project Manager Interview Questions

Job interviews are enough to make normal men and women tremble with fear. There are some people out there that can think on the fly and charm their way through any situation. For the rest of us, there is a need for preparation, and lots of it. As with any job interview, make sure you research the company thoroughly. Memorize their mission statement and be able to summarize the company's primary goals. Once you have done this research, take a look at the following questions that are likely to surface through your Project Manager interviewing process. Once you are capable of answering these questions with confidence and authority, your interview should be a cinch.

Describe your managerial style.

The interviewers ask this question to determine if your managerial style is consistent with their own. If they are firm and a bit distant with their staff, they will not be overly fond of a manager who takes their staff to breakfast once a week and lets their team walk all over them. However, be honest in your answers. If your managerial style does not, in fact, jive with the style they are used to, be prepared to demonstrate instances in your career where your own style has been successful. Are you a hands-off or a hands-on type of manager? Explain why.

What do you look for in a team member or employee you would like to hire?



Do you surround yourself with people that are easy to maintain and control or do you hire a staff that brings their own specific talents to the table? As the traditional image of the corporate "boss" begins to fade and the new image of the corporate "leader" emerges, it is to your benefit to surround yourself with those who possess talents and abilities that you lack. No longer should a manager stifle his team and lead with intimidation. A manager should help each team member nurture their own natural talents.

How would your colleagues and team members describe you?

While your nature would be to answer this question modestly, answer the question honestly. If your team members admire your managerial style, say so. Do not be afraid to toot your own horn, although don't toot too loudly.

How would you motivate a staff member whose performance is not up to par?

This is a pretty straightforward question. More than likely, if you have been in a managerial position in the past, you have been faced with this dilemma. Were you more inclined to use intimidation with this employee? Did you put his or her job on the line if their performance did not greatly improve? Perhaps you were a little more compassionate and talked through issues the staff member may have been having that might have affected his or her performance. Explain your rationale for dealing with the situation in this way and the outcome.

Describe a project you have led from beginning to end.

This is, once again, a chance to toot your own horn. Be thorough in your answer without getting too detailed. Explain the project as you would to a client and not to somebody who may have been directly involved. Remember, this is the first time they have heard of this project and they will probably be unfamiliar as to its ins and outs. Be excited about your accomplishments. Your excitement will transfer to the interviewer and they will feel that you are passionate about what you do and what you have accomplished.

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