What Is Roseola Virus?

What is roseola? It is an infectious virus that many infants under three years old can catch, but is most common in infants under age one. Roseola is thought to be caused by the human herpes virus six.

Roseola is an infectious virus that many infants under three years old can catch, but is most common in infants under age one. Roseola is thought to be caused by the human herpes virus six.

The first symptom you will notice in your baby is an unexplained very high fever. The fever can be as high as 104 to 106 degrees, which is very distressing. The fever can last from one to five days and then disappear. Within twenty four hours later a rash will appear on the neck, upper arms and the trunk, and then spread to the face and legs. Your baby may also get diarhea, nausea, and vomitting. You will notice swollen lymph glands under the baby's neck. You may notice the symptoms of the common cold such as runny nose, loss of appetite, irritability, and sore throuat. When the rash subsides, all the

other symptoms will leave also. The total duration of all symptoms is usually 7 to ten days.



Roseola is highly contagious, being spread through contact with saliva or being breathed on by another baby with roseola. What makes the spread of this infection hard to control is the fact that a child can be infectious with it for 10 days prior to getting a fever and for five days after the fever is gone. Of course you should always keep your baby away from other babies with rashes or fevers.

Roseola is generally a non-eventful childhood illness. Once it has run its course, it goes away with out any further complications. But, sometimes the high fever will result in a seizure. This kind of seizure is called a febrile seizure. Sometimes the first symptom

you may notice with roseola is a seizure if the fever comes on suddenly. Call for emergency help immediately if your baby is having a seizure. While you are waiting for emergency help clear the area around your child from toys or other objects they can get hurt on. Stay near your child and watch them carefully. Try to keep your child upright with out restraining them. Do not put anything into your child's mouth if they are having a seizure, they will choke. If your child vomits, lay them on their side to get the vomit out of their mouth.

If your baby has a very high fever, but has not had a seizure, treat the fever aggressively to reduce it quickly. Keep your baby on the recommended dosage of acetaminophen or ibuprofen, but never give a baby or child aspirin. Giving a child aspirin while they have a viral infection can cause Reye's Syndrome, a very seriuos condition that can result in brain damage.

Keep your child hydrated with plenty of liquids. If your baby is breastfeeding, make sure you are drinking extra water. Breastfeed your baby more often. Give your child more water, soups, and diluted fruit juices. Popsicles made of electrolyte drinks and gelatin are excellent ways to get a sick child to consume more liquids.

© High Speed Ventures 2011