Scented Craft Recipes: Blue, Rose, And Other Homemade Potpourri Ideas

Learn how to make your own potpourri for yourself or to give as gifts.

Making homemade potpourri is a very easy way to brighten up your home and add a touch of scent. Homemade potpourri also makes a wonderful gift for any occasion. Almost any kind of dried flowers and leaves can be included in potpourri. Try looking around for interesting items while walking through the woods or your garden, or search for potpourri supplies on the internet. To dry your own materials, use an old window screen propped up on several books. Lay the materials flat on the screen and place in a dry, dark place until dry. Choose colors and materials that complement each other. Don't worry if your potpourri doesn't smell very much at first, you can always add some scented or essential oil to make it smell good.

When mixing potpourri, first combine all dry ingredients in a large container, then add scented or essential oil if you'd like. Alternatively, you can scent a fixative material such as orris root or cellulose fiber and then add it to the potpourri mixture. After everything is mixed, store it in a large closed container for a week or two to cure.

To make a rose potpourri:

4 c. rosebuds and petals

2 c. larkspur petals

1 c. lemon verbena leaves

1 c. globe amaranth

1 c. uva ursi leaves

1/2 c. whole cloves

1/2 c. orris root chips

Several drops of rose scented oil, if desired.

To make a pretty blue potpourri:

2 c. larkspur petals

2 c. globe amaranth

1 c. lavender flowers

1 c. lemon verbena leaves

1 c. uva ursi leaves

1/2 c. cellulose fiber

Several drops lavender oil, if desired.

Trivet mix:

6 c. whole coriander

2 c. cellulose fiber

2 c. small cinnamon chips

1 c. whole allspice

1 c. whole cloves

1 c. ginger root pieces

several drops cinnamon scented oil

Allow to cure at least 4 weeks. This mixture is used for filling trivets and hot pads. To make: cut an even number of fabric squares (the size is up to you). Place two squares with the right sides facing each other and sew along three edges and half of the fourth. Turn the pouch right side out and fill with trivet mixture. Be sure the trivet will lie flat when filled. Sew the opening closed and enjoy. When a hot pan or mug is placed on the trivet, it will warm the spices and release the scent.



For an apple spice simmering potpourri:

4 c. dried apple slices

1 c. whole allspice

1 c. star anise

1 c. whole bay leaves

1 c. 1" cinnamon sticks

1 c. dried orange peel

1/2 c. whole cloves

1/2 c. cellulose fiber

several drops apple or apple spice scented oil, if desired.

To use simmering potpourri: On the stove, add a few spoonfuls to boiling water in a stainless steel saucepan. Reduce heat and simmer uncovered. In a simmering pot, add several spoonfuls to the hot water. Simmering potpourri can be heated for hours at a time, but be sure to check the water levels frequently and add warm tap water as needed. Throw the potpourri away after it has simmered. Remember, potpourri is not for human consumption.

And lastly, an orange spice simmering potpourri:

3 c. dried orange slices

1 c. dried orange peel

1 c. dried diced apples

1 c. whole bay leaves

1 c. whole allspice

1 c. star anise

1 c. cinnamon chips or 1" cinnamon sticks

1 c. whole cloves

Several drops of orange scented oil, if desired.

Follow the above directions for scented potpourri.

To come up with your own blends, try following the following guidelines:

1 c. dried flowers

1/2 c. herbs or dried leaves

1/4 c. whole or broken spices

2 T. orris root

Several drops of scented oil.

Don't feel you need to be restricted to what you "normally" find in potpourri. Use whatever strikes your fancy. Go out there, experiment, and have fun!

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