How To Know If Your Spouse Is An Alcoholic

Look here to see if you think your spouse could be an alcoholic.

Recognizing whether or not your spouse is an alcoholic is a difficult thing to do. Not only do you need to consider their drinking habits but also how your own life has been affected and how you deal with your spouse's drinking. The role of codependent is a big one and even though you may not be buying alcohol for your mate, your behaviors may be affecting the entire family dynamic.

One misconception about alcoholism is that someone needs to be consuming large quantities of alcohol to be considered an alcoholic. Someone who drinks only on weekends can be every bit as much of an alcoholic as someone who drinks on weekdays. It is more important to look at drinking patterns and reasons for drinking.

Someone who is clearly drinking to relieve stress is to be considered a potential alcoholic. While some people may think it is fine to have a few beers after work and blow off some steam, it can also be a sign that your spouse is unable to effectively deal with job difficulties and needs the outlet of drinking to diffuse the situation.



The same goes for someone who heads to the bar after a fight with their spouse. This can also become a pattern, a form of escaping reality.

Alcoholics also tend to have certain personality traits. They tend to blame others for things that go wrong. Responsibility becomes something they do not want to accept and would rather put on other people. For a marriage in trouble, it is often the alcoholic who accuses the other for something gone wrong rather than accept their drinking might be the real heart of the issue.

Look at your own involvement in drinking as well. Even if you don't buy the alcohol, do you determine when, where and how often your spouse drinks? This may seem like an effective way to control the situation but the drinkers need to control it themselves. Because once the source of restriction is gone, the freedom to drink at will returns and nothing has been solved.

The lack of accepting responsibility for one's own actions couples with the lack of responsibility either on the job or in family life. An alcoholic often ignores their family or tasks that need to be done at home. It is usually the other spouse who picks up the load to accommodate the alcoholic's dysfunctional behavior. Look at where your spouse isn't helping out and the reasons for it. Consistently letting family or home life responsibilities go can also be a sign that your spouse is struggling with a drinking problem.

While there is no easy answer when considering your spouse's drinking problem, looking at the whole picture rather than just the amount of alcohol being consumed will make the situation easier to sort out.

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