Symptoms, Causes And Treatments Of Reye's Syndrome

Reye's Syndrome is a childhood complication that can occur after a viral infection. The child will get a very high fever, convulsions that sometimes will result in a coma.

Reye's Syndrome is a childhood complication that can occur after a viral infection. The child will get a very high fever, convulsions that sometimes will result in a coma. This article will go over what causes Reye's syndrome, what the symptoms are and what to do if your child gets it.

The cause of Reye's Syndrome is not totally understood by doctors yet: however there have been connections made between taking aspirin while having a viral illness. This is why you should never give a child any form of aspirin or any product containing aspirin.

Reyes Syndrome is most commonly developed in children up to the age of 18. And strangely enough it occurs mostly in the fall and winter months.



The symptoms of Reye's Syndrome are fatigue, fever, disorientation, headache, nausea, vomiting, confusion, irritability, aggression or apathy and loss of memory. Your child will have just been recovering from a viral illness, such as chicken pox, and then they will get the above symptoms and be sick all over again. The condition will change rapidly to more serious complications; loss of consciousness, hallucinations, hyperventilation, weakness and seizures.

Take your child to the emergency room immediately with any of the above symptoms. The earlier you can get them treatment the complications will be less severe. Some of the complications of this disease are life threatening and debilitating involving the pancreas, liver, brain, kidney, heart, spleen and lymph nodes.

To diagnose the illness the doctor will need to do a blood test, and possibly an EEG (brain function), an EKG (heart testing) and a liver biopsy to see what damage has been done. To help your doctor make an early diagnosis tell him if your child was previously sick and you gave him aspirin. Your child will be hospitalized in intensive care for several weeks. If the diagnosis is made early your child will recover fully.

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