How To Use The Heavy Bag For A Great Workout

Using a heavy bag in your workout routine can be very beneficial. Here are a list of ways to use this tool.

Check with your doctor before starting an exercise program.

Heavy bag work is fun, but grueling. Striking bags that can weigh from 60 to 125 pounds develops stamina and strength, while simulating the feel of a live opponent. A Heavy bag can be purchased at most martial arts and sporting goods store.

Heavy Bag Basics: Bag gloves or hand wraps should also be worn to protect the hands while striking the bag. Make sure to keep your wrist aligned with your forearm and to strike with the top two knuckles of the middle and index finger.

Exercise #1 Straight Jab: With your hands held high shuffle forward and strike the bag head high with your lead hand. Remember the closest distance to two points is a straight line. Make sure your hand travels directly to the target, and that it does not retract before coming forward. Practice circling right and left while delivering the punch. Perform this exercise for two rounds with both feet forward.



Exercise #2 Jab-Cross: The hook is one of the most powerful blows in boxing. With your hands held high, shuffle forward and strike the bag head high with your lead hand, and then the rear hand. Twist your rear hand as you deliver the second blow. This is called a two-punch combination, and is usually delivered with a one-two beat. Sometimes, however, it is good to break the rhythm in order to confuse the opponent. Practice circling the bag in both directions and throwing the combination in different ways high-low, and low high. Perform this exercise for two rounds with both feet forward.

Exercise # 3 Jab-Hook: Like the cross, the hook is one of the most powerful blows in boxing. A hook blow starts out like a straight jab thrown to the outside of the opponent's guard. At the last second the elbow flips upward and the blow strikes at a 90-degree angle to the head or body. It is best to set up this punch by moving in the direction of the lead or hooking hand. For example, if you are throwing a right hook, step to the right. Make sure to alter the way you throw your combinations, high-low-high, low-high-low, high-high-high, high-high-low, low-low-high, etc. Perform this exercise for two rounds with both feet forward.

Exercise # 4 Jab-Hook-Hook: This is one of the most popular combinations in boxing, a jab followed by a double hook. Practice throwing the hooks both high and low, and perform this exercise for two rounds with both feet forward.

Exercise # 5 Jab-Uppercut: Like the cross and the hook, the uppercut is a devastating blow. Sometimes called a corkscrew punch, the uppercut is thrown by lowering the shoulder and the corkscrewing the hand upward. Make sure to keep the elbow in tight, and in front of the your body. This is an excellent punch top throw to the body and chin. As a body punch, the blow rises underneath the opponent's elbow and into the ribs. As a head strike the blow strikes under the chin, snapping the head backwards, and causing a whiplash like action. Perform this exercise for two rounds with both feet forward.

Exercise #6 Jab-Cross-Hook or Uppercut: This is similar to exercises #3 and # 4 except a hook or uppercut follows the cross. Practice this exercise moving in the direction of the lead or hooking hand. For example, if you are throwing a right hook, step to the right. Perform this exercise for two rounds with both feet forward.

These are some of the simpler exercises that can be performed on the heavy bag. The workout takes a total of 47 minutes to complete. Remember to always keep your guard, hands, up when training. There is a tendency to lower the hands when a person gets tired, and the hands become heavy. This is the most important time to keep up your guard, because in a real life situation it is when you are most vulnerable! It is equally important to remember to alter the way in which you throw your combinations. Altering heights not only confuses your opponent, but works different muscles for a better workout.

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