Do It Yourself: A Guide To Making School Furniture

How to make simple school furniture with easy to get items. Advice for structures that benefit a classroom.

Every teacher knows it is important to have the materials and furniture she needs to teach her class well. But in these times of tight school budgets, some things can be lacking in a classroom that a teacher has to come up with for herself. Usually, the hardest thing to get is the school furniture you would like to really make your classroom special, useful, and convenient. Making your own classroom furniture can be fun, cheap, and easy. All you need is a little creativity and maybe the help of some students and you will be on your way to having the classroom of your dreams.

The Cozy Area

Reading is important, and making reading fun and appealing is even more important. That's why many teachers today are incorporating "Cozy Areas" into their classroom. A cozy area is a place where students can snuggle in to read for a special treat. Some teachers use soft upholstered chairs for their Cozy Area, but if you don't have the budget or resources there are other ways you can make a nice place to read. To start, first pick a corner that is open enough for several children to fit comfortably into at one time. Then, fill the corner with fluffy pillows bought at a thrift store or old couch cushions covered with a colorful blanket. Enclose the area by surrounding with small book shelves for that "away from schoolwork feeling."

Bookshelves

One thing that a classroom cannot get enough of is bookshelves. Below is an easy way to make one that has three shelves.



Materials:

4 Cinder Blocks (You may be able to get these from construction sites for free.)

2 6x2 4-foot Planks of Wood

Put two cinder blocks four feet apart and put one of the planks on top. Next, put two more cinder blocks over the last two, above the board. Top the last two cinder blocks with the last plank of wood. (Don't make a bookshelf like this that has more than three shelves. It may fall, causing injury.)

Timeout Room

If you work with younger children and a timeout is part of your discipline techniques, than a Timeout Room may be a great addition to your classroom. The Timeout Room makes the child in trouble feel secluded from the other children and the children that are not in timeout will also not be able to distract the child in timeout.

Materials:

1 Tension Rod

1 Curtain (a shower curtain or a long drape.)

A Chair (optional)

Choose a quiet corner of the classroom. Put your curtain on your rod, then place the rod halfway up the wall or a little above your tallest child's head, this way the room won't be dark. You can put a chair inside the "room," or leave it empty so that the child has to stand. As you can see, with a few supplies, and a few minuets before school starts, you can add furniture to your room to make it special, convenient, and orderly.

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