Do It Yourself: How To Get Paint Off Your Skin

How to remove paint from your skin without using harsh chemicals. Removing paint can be as easy as looking in your fridge or medicine cabinet.

Painting is an involved process that usually yields beautiful and satisfactory results. Unfortunately, painting can also be very messy and it's almost inevitable that you'll get some paint on your skin. This can be a frustrating and even painful experience. Paint isn't made to wash away, so removing it from your skin can be difficult.

A lot of people assume they have to use strong chemicals to remove paint from their skin. This practice can be smelly as well as dangerous. The use of mineral spirits, paint thinner, or turpentine is usually not necessary. There are plenty of items you may have in your home that will take the paint off just as easily as the harsh chemicals.

If the paint on your skin is still a bit wet or tacky, warm water and mild dish soap will usually take it right off. Be sure to rinse the area thoroughly even after it appears the paint is gone. If you have sensitive skin there may be a small amount of residue left that will cause irritation, rinsing the area further will help eliminate any irritation.



If the paint has dried it will be a bit more difficult to remove. Simply slathering a bit of butter or margarine on the area will usually help to peel the paint right off. The oils in the butter or margarine make it difficult for the paint to adhere to the surface, making it easy to clean the area. This technique is useful as almost everyone has butter or margarine on hand. A bit more scrubbing with soap and water will be needed to remove the margarine, as well as any remaining bits of paint stuck to hair.

If you don't have margarine or butter on hand you can also try using petroleum jelly or your favorite cream or lotion. This works much the same way as the butter or margarine, with the oils not allowing the paint to stick to the surface. Again, be sure to wash with soap and water afterward to remove any remaining paint residue.

If you don't have any of the above, citrus cleaner always works really well at removing paint. The type of citrus cleaner that has small granules in it tends to work best, as the texture of the granules will lift the paint right off the skin. This variety of citrus cleaner is usually found in automotive shops or in the home repair part of your hardware store. As with all the products, continue to rinse after the paint is gone to ensure any residue has also been washed away.

Even with some of the methods above you may have a stubborn spot or two of paint that just don't want to come off. Be patient, after a shower or two it'll be gone and you'll forget it was ever there. You may need to apply extra lotion or cream to the area for a couple days, but the area won't be an issue for long.

To avoid paint on your skin next time be sure to use the proper technique, the appropriate brush for the surface, and don't overload your paint brush or roller. You may still end up with a few specks of paint on you, but painting with care will eliminate much of the mess.

© High Speed Ventures 2011