Do It Yourself Repair: Common Repairs For A Weed Eater

If your weedeater is giving you problems, it is good to know how to do simple repairs and maintenance to extend the life of the tool.

If you have just purchased a weed eater or your old weed eater is giving you problems, it is good to know how to do simple repairs and maintenance to extend the life of the tool. Amazingly, weed eaters are one of the simplest yard tools to take care of. One of the first things you should do to keep your weed eater in good condition is to clean it. It is important not to clean your weed eater with water or gas, which may destroy the engine. The best, and easiest way to clean it is by blowing off dirt and grass with an air compressor or a leaf-blower after every use. If the dirt or grass is really stuck on, you can use a small putty knife to scrape any leftover crud away.

The next most important thing to maintain on your weed eater is string. When the string gets low you can remove the lower part of the head (the part that the string comes out of) by pushing in slightly and turning the head counterclockwise. Cut the new string no shorter than 6 inches or the weed eater will not advance the string properly when in use. Thread the string back though the guides, making sure to follow the arrows on the guide. If the string is not put through the guides the right way, the head may pop off during use. Next, replace the bottom of the head by pushing and turning clockwise. You can totally skip this step by buying a string replacement cartridge. Though it is much more expensive, it saves you the trouble of having to restring your weed eater yourself.

If you find that the head of your weed eater is worn on bottom or hard to get off to replace the string then it is time to replace it. This can be done very simply by unscrewing the two screws at the top of the head and slipping it off. Then, just slide the new one on and tighten the screws.



After a few months of use, you may find that your weed eater is losing power or that it is making a strange lower pitched noise. This may be caused by a dirty filter. To check, unscrew the knob or wing nut on the carburetor. Inside you will find a small square screen, this is the filter. If the filter is gray or black then it is time for it to be cleaned. The easiest way to clean it is to blow it out with an air compressor. It can also be washed with plain water, but you must let it dry before placing it back into the carburetor. Once the filter is white or only light grey it is ready to use again.

Always make sure to mix the gas and two-cycle oil in the proportions that are listed in the weed eater's manual. Never use anything but two-cycle oil, normal car oil will not work and will damage your engine. As you can see, with just a little bit of time you can do most of the repairs and maintenance for your weed eater yourself.

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